Wednesday, August 12, 2020

Citrus fruits




Research has shown that citrus fruits, such as oranges, grapefruits, and lemons, have antidiabetic effects.

Eating citrus fruits is a great way to get vitamins and minerals from fruit without the carbohydrates.

Some researchers believe that two bioflavonoid antioxidants, called hesperidin and naringin, are responsible for the antidiabetic effects of oranges.

Citrus fruits are also a great source of:

  • vitamin C
  • folate
  • potassium

Wednesday, August 5, 2020

The dietary approach to stop hypertension (DASH) plan



The DASH plan was originally developed to help treat or prevent high blood pressure (hypertension), but it may also reduce the risk of other diseases, including diabetes. It may have the additional benefit of helping you lose weight. People following the DASH plan are encouraged to reduce portion sizes and eat foods rich in blood pressure-lowering nutrients, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium.

The DASH eating plan includes:

lean protein: fish, poultry
plant-based foods: vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts, seeds
dairy: fat-free or low-fat dairy products
grains: whole grains
healthy fats: vegetable oils

People with diabetes on this plan are advisedTrusted Source to reduce their sodium intake to 1,500 milligrams per day. The plan also limits sweets, sugary beverages, and red meats.

The Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet is inspired by traditional foods from the Mediterranean. This diet is rich in oleic acid, a fatty acid that occurs naturally in animal and vegetable-based fats and oils. Countries that are known for eating according to this diet pattern include Greece, Italy, and Morocco.

A Mediterranean-type diet may be successful in lowering fasting glucose levels, reducing body weight, and reducing the risk of metabolic disorder, according to a study in Diabetes Spectrum.

Foods eaten on this diet include:

Protein: poultry, salmon and other fatty fish, eggs
Plant-based foods: fruits, vegetables like artichokes and cucumbers, beans, nuts, seeds
Healthy fats: olive oil, nuts such as almonds

Red meat may be consumed once per month. Wine may be consumed in moderation, as it may boost heart health. Remember to never drink on an empty stomach if you are on medications that raise the level of insulin in the body.

The paleolithic (paleo) diet

The paleo diet centers on the belief that modern agriculture is to blame for chronic disease. Followers of the paleo diet eat only what our ancient ancestors would have been able to hunt and gather.

Foods eaten on the paleo diet include:

Protein:meat, poultry, fish
Plant-based foods: nonstarchy vegetables, fruits, seeds, nuts (excluding peanuts)
Healthy fats:olive oil,avocado oil, coconut oil, flaxseed oil, walnut oil

The paleo diet may be a good option for people with diabetes as long as the person does not have kidney disease. According to a three-month study in the Journal of Diabetes Science and TechnologyTrusted Source, a paleo diet may improve glycemic control in the short term for people with type 2 diabetes.

The gluten-free diet

Gluten-free diets have become trendy, but for people with celiac disease, eliminating gluten from the diet is necessary to avoid damage to the colon and body. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder that causes your immune system to attack your gut and nervous system. It also promotes body-wide inflammation, which could lead to chronic disease.

Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and all foods made from these grains. According to the American Diabetes Association, 10 percent of those with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease.

Ask your doctor for a blood test for celiac disease. Even if it comes back negative, you could still be intolerant to gluten. Talk with your doctor about whether a gluten-free diet is right for you.

While anyone with diabetes can take up a gluten-free diet, it may add unnecessary restrictions for those without celiac disease. It’s also important to remember that gluten-free is not synonymous with low carb. There are plenty of processed, high-sugar, gluten-free foods. There is usually no need to complicate meal planning by eliminating gluten unless you need to.

Vegetarian and vegan diets

Some people with diabetes focus on eating vegetarian or vegan diets. Vegetarian diets typically refer to diets where no meat is eaten, but animal products like milk, eggs, or butter can be consumed. Vegans will not eat meat or any other type of animal product, including honey, milk, or gelatin.

Foods that are healthy for vegetarians and vegans with diabetes include:

beans
soy
dark, leafy vegetables
nuts
legumes
fruits
whole grains

While vegetarian and vegan diets can be healthy diets to follow, those who follow them may be missing out on vital nutrients if they aren’t careful.

Some nutrients vegetarians or vegans may need to obtain through supplements include:

Calcium. Found largely in animal products like dairy, calcium is an important nutrient that contributes to the health of bones and teeth. Broccoli and kale can help provide necessary calcium, but supplements may be needed in a vegan diet.

Iodine. Required for metabolizing food into energy, iodine is predominantly found in seafood. Without these animal products in their diets, vegetarians and vegans may have trouble getting enough of the necessary iodine. Supplements can be beneficial.

B-12: Since only animal products have vitamin B-12, a supplement may be necessary for those following a strict vegetarian diet.

Zinc: The main source of zinc comes from high protein animal products, and a supplement may be advised for those on a vegetarian diet.

Thursday, July 30, 2020

8 Causes of Night Sweats



Doctors often hear their patients complain of night sweats. Night sweats refer to excess sweating during the night. But if your bedroom is unusually hot or you are wearing too many bedclothes, you may sweat during sleep, and this is normal. True night sweats are severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench your clothes and sheets and that are not related to an overheated environment.

It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or body) may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats.

There are many different causes of night sweats. To find the cause, a doctor must get a detailed medical history and order tests to decide what medical condition is responsible for the night sweats. Some of the known conditions that can cause night sweats are:

Menopause. The hot flashes that accompany menopause can occur at night and cause sweating. This is a very common cause of night sweats in women.

Idiopathic hyperhidrosis. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the body chronically produces too much sweat without any identifiable medical cause.

Infections. Tuberculosis is the infection most commonly associated with night sweats. But bacterial infections, such as endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), osteomyelitis (inflammation in the bones), and abscesses can cause night sweats. Night sweats are also a symptom of HIV infection.

Cancers. Night sweats are an early symptom of some cancers. The most common type of cancer associated with night sweats is lymphoma. However, people who have an undiagnosed cancer frequently have other symptoms as well, such as unexplained weight loss and fevers.

Medications. Taking certain medications can lead to night sweats. Antidepressant medications are a common type of drug that can lead to night sweats. From 8% to 22% of people taking antidepressant drugs have night sweats. Other psychiatric drugs have also been associated with night sweats. 
Medicines taken to lower fever, such as aspirin and acetaminophen, can sometimes lead to sweating. 
Many other drugs can cause night sweats or flushing.

Hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar can cause sweating. People who are taking insulin or oral diabetes medications may have hypoglycemia at night that is accompanied by sweating.

Hormone disorders. Sweating or flushing can be seen with several hormone disorders, including pheochromocytoma, carcinoid syndrome, and hyperthyroidism.

Neurologic conditions. Uncommonly, neurologic conditions including autonomic dysreflexia, posttraumatic syringomyelia, stroke, and autonomic neuropathy may cause increased sweating and may lead to night sweats.

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